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FRESHWATER FILMS, LLC

COMPANY HISTORY

AND

PHILOSOPHY

 Fresh Water Films was founded in the summer of 2002. In that summer, Duncan Rogers had a story he believed needed to be told... on film. As an actor, Duncan had appeared in front of the camera quite often, but his work had never taken him behind one. This project was going to give him a chance to produce and direct for the first time. 

Duncan set out by gathering the advice and input of many friends. One of these friends, Neil McGarry, had produced and directed his own movie with St. Joseph’s Films. After reading a ton of books and soliciting advice from other actors, filmmakers, and producers, Freshwater Films was born and The Ables' House is Green became the first of its planned projects.

In September of 2002 both the company and the film project were launched; literally, as the first images captured on film by Freshwater Films were taken by two guys in a rowboat at dawn.

 

                         

Freshwater Films believes these things. 

1)      We will not make long stories short, or short stories long.

2)      We will not sacrifice image because can’t we can’t afford the right medium.

3)      We will not underestimate the intelligence of our audience.

4)      We will hit up everyone we meet for at least $20.

 

Some explanation of those points follows..

    

1)      We will not make long stories short, or short stories long.

           To make a long story short is to rob the audience of the fun of that particular journey. By the same token making a short story long often bores the hell out of the viewer. It is a fact that a given story takes a given amount of time to be told, effectively. I would cite Aaron Sorkin as the poster boy for this argument. Back in 1988 he wrote a one-act play called “Hidden in this Picture” which was produced at the West Bank Café Theater, that great room below that great restaurant. Well it did so well some folks said, hey make it a full-length play and we will produce it, which in fact someone did, at the Promenade Theater in 1990. It tanked. It was a story that only needed one act to tell. Stretching it merely diluted the effectiveness of the storytelling. This is something I believe, fiercely. That stories take a certain amount of time to tell and usually the characters and situation will tell you when enough is enough.

 

2)      We will not sacrifice image because can’t we can’t afford the right medium.

            The quality of the image is important as well as the quality of the material. Some stories are right at home on video. Others demand the texture and flexibility of film. The Ables House is Green demanded film. With the location as much a character as the people I needed to have the depth of color and “feel” of film that is just not possible with video. Other projects will work great on video and I look forward to shooting them. But I will lobby hard to make sure that the story and the medium are a perfect match.

 

 

3)     We will not underestimate the intelligence of our audience.

             I generally admire the films of Francis Ford Coppola..right up to the release in 1992 of Dracula. This film insulted my intelligence. Every single time Dracula would feed we were treated to a 2X4 up side the head as Coppola cut to a XCU of blood coursing through veins, as if we didn’t get it. It is lazy filmmaking. Assume the best of your audience and you will get the best out of them. People are much more willing to be thoughtfully engaged then most of the television industry is willing to admit and a large part of the film industry. I am not against entertainment; I love Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and Caddyshack as much as the next guy. I just think if we raise our bar, the audience will raise theirs. And that is to everyone’s benefit.

 

 

4)     We will hit up everyone we meet for at least $20.

         Yup. 20 Bucks. Minimum, if we can soak you for more we will.!